Building Global Citizens

WORD STUDY

Global citizens can be defined as problem solvers that are future focused. They understand growth is necessary for both the individual and the community in order to promote continued progress. They understand that to make the best possible progress, it is important to be proactive.

This week, students investigated the morphology and etymology of <proactive>. Once the denotation of <proactive> was uncovered, students began hypothesizing possible morphemes of <proactive>. The following hypotheses represents their initial thinking…

* <pro + active> –> proactive

* <pro + act + ive> –> proactive

* <pro + ac + tive> –> proactive

To determine which hypothesis was accurate, students first had to prove the morphemes. Students brainstormed words that used the identified prefix and suffix to check their theories. Once satisfied with the accuracy of the word’s affixes, students moved onto determining the base. Here they used Etymology Online to determine the root. Many groups looked up <active> because they were certain <pro-> was a prefix. Some looked up <act> because they were certain <-ive> was a suffix.

Etymology Online uncovered <act> as the free base element coming from Latin agere/actum/actus meaning “to do; set in motion.” This left students with the correct word sum of <pro + act + ive> –> proactive, which they quickly connected the meaning of the root to the dictionary definition stating proactive meant to set something in motion before it becomes a problem. Good thinking.

Finally, they were challenged to find as many related words to <act> as they could, showcasing their thinking in a word web.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

LANGUAGE ARTS/SOCIAL STUDIES

We are close to wrapping up the Impacts Unit. Students are making final additions and revisions to their written proposals asking the UNISDR to fund their country’s disaster risk reduction plan and finalizing their visuals for Thursday’s and Friday’s presentations.

To ensure both the proposal and presentation are effective, students learned about Aristotle’s rhetoric – the three means of persuasion: logos, pathos and ethos.

In their final rewrites, students are looking to inject emotional anecdotes, supporting statistical data and credible sources into their proposals to feel confident their appeals are persuasive.

To help your child prepare for the presentation, please allow them to practice the art of persuasion on you.

The students have placed so much hard work and effort into this project; they should be proud of their accomplishments. I know I am proud of them.

BLOGGING

And all the while, students continue blogging. Please check out their voices on our classroom blog, Wonderland. Student links are on the right sidebar.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s